Cypress PSoC4 Pioneer Kit Review

28 08 2013

I mostly work with microcontrollers and occasionally FPGAs. I already had a PSoC3 board that a Japanese magazine was giving so I had a pretty good idea about what PSoC is. For those of you who are new to the term, PSoC stands for Programmable System-on-Chip, it is like a System-on-Chip as it has analog and digital components and a microcontroller core and all of the parts inside it are programmable. You can do things in the microcontroller like look-up tables, then decide to move them to the digital logic part of it to save some memory and faster response. Before I begin with my review, I have to warn some about it: Although this board comes in Arduino form factor, using it is definitely harder than an Arduino. You actually have to set up the peripherals (or components as Cypress calls them) in a schematic editor like you are doing a circuit schematic, open each peripherals’ settings and set them (like ADC channels, sampling rate …), then you can move onto coding. But more about this later.

Kit Contents

The kit contains the development board with the 4200 family PSoC, a USB cable, 6 jumper wires and a quick start guide. There is not much on the quickstart guide, but the link there (http://www.cypress.com/go/CY8CKIT-042) is important. It takes you to the product page where you can get the PSoC Creator (the IDE), the kit datasheet and a program that adds kit examples into the IDE.

Kit contents. Brochure on the left, board on the right top, USB and jumper cables on right bottom.

Kit contents. Brochure on the left, board on the right top, USB and jumper cables on right bottom.

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